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Preferred option of a new community hospital in the Forest of Dean approved by Gloucestershire Care …

Gloucestershire Care Services NHS Trust Board has approved the preferred option for a new community hospital in the Forest of Dean to replace the Dilke Memorial Hospital and Lydney and...

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Gloucestershire Care Services NHS Trust colleagues given the prestigious title of Queen’s Nurse

Gloucestershire Care Services NHS Trust colleagues Liz Lewindon, Integrated Community Team Nurse, and Nancy Farr, Clinical Development Manager, have been given the prestigious title of Queen’s Nurse (QN) by community...

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Gloucestershire Care Services NHS Trust Board has approved the preferred option for a new community hospital in the Forest of Dean to replace the Dilke Memorial Hospital and Lydney and District Hospital. The Board also approved the criteria that will be used to consider a preferred location for the hospital, and agreed to commission an independent body to establish a panel which will include local people and professionals to make a recommendation on the location. 

This decision follows a three month consultation undertaken jointly by the Trust and NHS Gloucestershire Clinical Commissioning Group.  

In making their decision the Board were mindful of the issues and concerns that had been raised through the consultation process. The Board concluded, however, that no new or material information had been presented that would suggest that the case for change should be reviewed. In coming to their decision, the Trust Board also approved a number of recommendations to address the issues that had been identified through the consultation, with a particular focus on ensuring that any new hospital would have the right number of beds to meet the needs of the local population and ensuring travel and access issues were fully considered. 

Chief Executive of Gloucestershire Care Services NHS Trust, Katie Norton said:

“The Board carefully considered all of the feedback received and issues raised from the consultation and are grateful for the time that local people have given to share their views.  We know that there is more work to be done to provide assurance in a number of areas, and we hope that the recommendations we have agreed today demonstrate our commitment to getting this right.  We are determined that this new, significant investment, which will be funded by the Trust, will bring real benefit for the Forest of Dean and remain fully committed to working with the local community to take this forward. 

“The Board, and NHS Gloucestershire Clinical Commissioning Group, have been clear that no final decision has been made on the number of beds that will be provided in the new hospital. We have committed to undertake further analysis and to share this as we know this was a significant concern through the consultation. 

“Our Board appreciates and acknowledges the debt of gratitude we owe to local residents, who have helped develop healthcare facilities and services in the Forest of Dean over many generations. The Board also appreciates the great affection held for two hospitals in the Forest which have and will continue to serve their communities until a new hospital is open. We do understand that many people may feel unhappy with this decision, however as a Board we concluded that we have to act now, recognising that it is becoming increasingly difficult to deliver the high quality services that our teams want to provide”.  

 

26 January 2018

Gloucestershire Care Services NHS Trust colleagues Liz Lewindon, Integrated Community Team Nurse, and Nancy Farr, Clinical Development Manager, have been given the prestigious title of Queen’s Nurse (QN) by community nursing charity The Queen’s Nursing Institute (QNI). 

Nancy said, “I am passionate about care in the community and love my work. 

I feel very privileged to receive this recognition by the QNI. The QN title means that I can access support and information to help improve patient-centred care in Gloucestershire.” Liz is keen for other community-based nurses to apply and said “It’s a huge honour to be recognised for my passion and commitment, and I felt very proud to attend the ceremony in London.”

The title is not an award for past service, but indicates a commitment to high standards of patient care, learning and leadership. Nurses who hold the title benefit from developmental workshops, bursaries, network opportunities, and a shared professional identity. 

Dawn Allen QN, Professional Head of Community Nursing at the Trust said “Congratulations are due to Liz and Nancy for their success. Community nurses are expert professionals who make a vital contribution to patient health and wellbeing every day. As a national charity the QNI can share innovation and best practice, supporting nurses to deliver excellent healthcare to patients in local communities.”

The Trust currently has 15 nurses with the QN title.

QNI Professor Jean White and Elizabeth LewindonQNI Professor Jean White and Nancy Farr

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pictured photo 1: Professor Jean White with Liz Lewindon 

Pictured photo 2: Professor Jean White with Nancy Farr

 

22 January 2018

 




Macmillan Cancer Support is encouraging anyone affected by cancer in Gloucestershire to talk more openly about the emotional effects of cancer and to seek the support they need. Victoria Newland and Felice Marchetti small

As part of Cancer Talk Week from 22 to 29 January 2018, Macmillan wants to encourage people living with any type of cancer to seek emotional support at any point they might need it; whether that might be at diagnosis, during treatment or once they have been discharged.

Cancer patient Victoria Newland from Churchdown in Gloucestershire was diagnosed with breast cancer in September 2016 and after chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy, she self-referred to the Macmillan Next Steps Cancer Rehabilitation project in June last year. “It was just fantastic. I had finished my main treatment and it’s only then you have time to take stock and breathe. All your thought processes had been dealing with the here and now for so long. Then when it goes quiet at end of radiotherapy and you’re not running to appointments – you’re done.

“Then your mind starts to drift. I felt down and felt a heavy burden. Then a friend who’d had cancer told me about Next Steps as she had been helped by the project. The project staff took the time to listen to me and what I needed. For example, I went to the HOPE course where I met a group of people feeling the same and the relief of understanding what was happening to me and evolving strategies to get myself back on track was so powerful.

‘I’ve also benefited from the physical activity sessions and advice that will help me move forward and do my best to stop cancer recurring. Cancer, for me, does wear you down and Next Steps has provided the toolkit to put myself back together again. The programme is genuinely fantastic.”

The Next Steps project, which has so far helped more than 500 patients, is part of a wider programme of improving cancer care in the county involving Macmillan, Gloucestershire Care Services NHS Trust, NHS Gloucestershire Clinical Commissioning Group and Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. Delivered by Gloucestershire Care Services, it comprises a team of dedicated health professionals who provide one to one support and a suite of group support and education programmes and workshops to give patients knowledge, skills and confidence to encourage self-management and adopt healthy lifestyles, positive health and physical activity. This is backed by a learning and development programme to increase health and social care professionals’ confidence, communication and awareness of the rehabilitation and support needs of people living with and beyond cancer. 

Macmillan encourages anyone affected by cancer who wants to support someone they know, whether they are a family member, friend, colleague or carer, to seek emotional support from a Macmillan support specialist.  

If you would like to find out more about the Macmillan Cancer Information and Support service in your area, please visit www.macmillan.org.uk/inyourarea  

The Macmillan Support Line is open 9am to 8pm Monday to Friday and can be reached on 0808 808 0000. The dedicated support line staff can talk through any concerns and signpost to the nearest information and support centre. 

 You can also find out more about the Macmillan mobile information and support service on our big green buses that visit towns and cities across the UK at www.macmillan.org.uk/mobileinfo.  

 

22 January 2018

 

 

Consultation booklet coverThe 12 week Community Hospitals in the Forest of Dean public and staff consultation ended on 10 December 2017. We would like to thank everyone who took part and shared their views or submitted questions whether in person at one of the events, on-line or by completing the survey.

The Outcome of Consultation Report has now been published and is available here

We acknowledge the comments made by the County’s Health and Care Overview and Scrutiny Committee on the consultation process and would like to thank them for the feedback offered following consideration of the Outcome of Consultation Report.  

We will review and carefully consider all of the feedback received from members of the public, staff and community partners, before any decisions relating to the preferred option are made.

It is expected that a full report will be considered by the Board of Gloucestershire Care Services NHS Trust and the Governing Body of NHS Gloucestershire Clinical Commissioning Group in public session at the end of January 2018.

 

9 January 2018

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Congratulations to Ruth Hamlin for winning Best Newcomer at the Parkinson’s Disease Nurse Specialist Awards in 2017.

Ruth joined the Trust’s Parkinson’s team as a specialist nurse in April 2017, having previously worked as a hospital ward nurse in Bath looking after people with the disease.

Two months into her new role, Ruth found herself working on her own due to vacancies and sick leave within the team. She says “It was a huge challenge and I’ve had to learn quickly. I had only been in post eight weeks when I started working alone, and was very mindful of that when speaking with patients, relatives and carers. Luckily I have had a considerable amount of community nursing experience in my career and that has stood me in good stead.”

Despite the challenge, Ruth felt very supported by her team. “The advice from my colleagues has been invaluable and Marie Scheidel, team administrator, has kept me sane by taking charge of the administrative tasks.”

The awards are voted for by members of the Parkinson’s Disease Nurse Specialist Association (PDNSA), who recognised Ruth’s level of responsibility so early on in the role, and her commitment to providing excellent patient care.

“To be voted best newcomer by the Association is a huge honour and I was delighted to think that people voted for me.”

Ruth commutes to Gloucester from Bristol for work, and is often asked why she chooses to travel two hours a day. The answer, she says, is simple - “I just really wanted the job and I decided that it was worth the extra time it adds on to my working day.”

The Trust’s Parkinson’s team is made up of nurse specialists who provide clinical reviews, support and education for patients and their carers, and run a number of clinics across the county.

 

4 January 2018



The
Gloucestershire Wheelchair Assessment Service (GWAS) has launched a brand new website - http://www.gloswheelchairservice.nhs.uk/

The new website provides an online source of information about how referrals can be made to the service via a GP or healthcare professional, as well as guidance on the wheelchair assessment process, personal wheelchair budget, and support plan. The site is also BrowseAloud enabled, which provides speech and reading support tools, whether you are using a smartphone, computer tablet, PC or Mac.

Dan McAleavy, a local wheelchair user who helped co-produce the new website, said: “For people with complex, long term conditions, being able to access the right wheelchair, with appropriate support is of paramount importance. The new website is easy to navigate and will help educate local people on what services are available, how you choose a suitable wheelchair, as well as giving useful links to local community organisations.”

Head of Speech and Language Therapy, Gloucestershire Wheelchair Services, Integrated Community Equipment Services and Telecare Services, Jane Stroud said: “There are currently around 10,000 wheelchair users in Gloucestershire. Two thirds of them are regular users. Wheelchairs provide a significant gateway to independence, well-being and quality of life for thousands of adults and children. They play a substantial role in facilitating social inclusion and improving life chances through work, education and activities that many people who do not need wheelchairs take for granted.”

GWAS is part of Gloucestershire Care Services NHS Trust, and provides wheelchairs and wheelchair accessories to those with medium to high specialist needs and to those who will need the equipment for long term use of more than six months. If you have not visited the service before, an initial referral needs to be made via a healthcare professional. After the initial referral GWAS accepts self-referrals from individuals registered with the service.

The team based at the GWAS comprise of specialist clinicians (occupational therapists and physiotherapists) and technical instructors. They are supported by rehabilitation engineers and a rehabilitation technician. The whole team can provide specialist advice about posture and wheeled mobility.

 

19 December 2017 

 

  • Patients will be able to access pharmacy and urgent GP surgery services this year during the Christmas and New Year period
  • To find your nearest pharmacy and details of opening hours, see below:

 - Cheltenham

 - Cotswolds (inc. Cirencester)

 - Forest of Dean

 - Gloucester City

 - Stroud (inc. Dursley)

 - Tewkesbury

  • From 22 December to 7 January, urgent GP appointments are available from 8am – 8pm at either your GP surgery or another one. Contact your surgery during normal opening hours to book an appointment.
  • If it’s outside of normal GP surgery opening hours, call NHS 111 and they will make sure you receive the advice and care you need.
  • Gloucester Health Access Centre on Eastgate Street, Gloucester, is open on Christmas Day, Boxing Day and New Year’s Day between 8am and 8pm. Please call 01452 336 290 to make an appointment.
  • The ASAP website and ASAP Glos NHS App can also provide advice on your healthcare options and the right service if needed.
  • Remember to use Emergency Services wisely; call 999 only when it’s a serious injury or a life threatening situation such as unconsciousness, heavy loss of blood, severe chest pain or stroke.

 

19 December 2017 

 




Victoria Newland and Felice Marchetti smallA project helping patients take back control of their lives and speed recovery after treatment for breast, prostate or colorectal cancer has proved so powerful it has secured further funding from Macmillan Cancer Support. It brings Macmillan’s financial commitment to the project to just over £1m and means it will continue to March 2019, by which time it is planned to become an integral part of NHS cancer care within Gloucestershire. 

The Macmillan Next Steps Cancer Rehabilitation project, delivered by Gloucestershire Care Services NHS Trust, comprises a team of dedicated health professionals. They provide one to one support, a suite of group support and education programmes and workshops to give patients knowledge, skills and confidence to encourage self-management and adopt healthy lifestyles, positive health and physical activity. This is backed by a learning and development programme to increase health and social care professionals’ confidence, communication and awareness of the rehabilitation and support needs of people living with and beyond cancer. 

“We’ve learned a lot about what really helps cancer patients to recover quicker and get back on track since we started in 2016,” says Nikki Hawkins, Macmillan consultant allied health professional for the project. “Their feedback about what, how and where the project is delivered is helping to refine and create a service that can be extended to other cancer patients across the whole county.”

“It’s proving to be hugely beneficial for patients, and fits in with the aim for all cancer patients to have access to elements of the national recovery package by 2020,” says Elizabeth Wright, Macmillan’s strategic partnership manager. “Extending the project enables us to cover the whole of the county for breast, prostate and colorectal cancer patients and then complete links with other elements of NHS cancer diagnosis, treatment and care.”

Cancer patient Victoria Newland from Churchdown in Gloucestershire was diagnosed with breast cancer in September 2016 and after chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy, she self-referred to the project in June this year. “It was just fantastic. I had finished my main treatment and it’s only then you have time to take stock and breath. All your thought processes had been dealing with the here and now for so long. Then when it goes quiet at end of radiotherapy and you’re not running to appointments – you’re done.

“Then your mind starts to drift. I was down and felt a heavy burden. Then a friend who’d had cancer told me about Next Steps as she had been helped by the project. The Macmillan team took the time to listen to me and what I needed. For example, I went to the HOPE course and met a group of people feeling the same as me, and the relief of understanding what was happening and evolving strategies to get myself back on track was so powerful.”

‘I’ve also benefitted from the physical activity sessions and advice that will help me move forward and do my best to stop cancer recurring. Cancer, for me, does wear you down and Next Steps has provided the toolkit to put myself back together again. The programme is genuinely fantastic”

The project, which has so far helped more than 500 patients, is part of a wider programme of improving cancer care in the county involving Macmillan, Gloucestershire Care Services NHS Trust, NHS Gloucestershire Clinical Commissioning Group and Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. The growth in demand for cancer services will continue to create pressure within our health system. 

“With data showing the current need for these services doubling by 2030, we need to make sure we provide the services cancer patients need to get through their treatment and make the quickest and best recovery possible,” adds Elizabeth Wright. “Next Steps is going to play an important part in that future.”

To find out more about Macmillan Next Steps Cancer Rehabilitation, please click here.

1 December 2017